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we are square-dancing for our lives.

RAZORCAKE SEEKS FRESH BLOOD

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RAZORCAKE

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I know, I know! I keep promising new horror. This isn’t that horror. But we’re getting there, I promise.

Razorcake, perhaps the foremost print ‘zine currently going with regards to DIY and punk culture (although maybe a bit more pop punk orientated than, say, Maximum Rock ‘n’ Roll) is currently seeking to expand their staff of comic creators. If you’ve got something that you think might fit in alongside the talents of, say, Mitch Clem, Ben Snakepit, or Liz Prince, then it might be a good time to contact Razorcake‘s editorial staff. Email them with your best Kid Dynamite-inspired puns. They’ll be tickled forever.

And hey, if you’ve never checked out an issue of Razorcake, it’s never too late to surrender your soul to the diabolical influences of punk rock. Every issue is jam-packed with the best stuff related to underground music, humor, comics, and DIY ethos, all in glorious black and white. Razorcake has been in print bimonthly for over a decade, basically picking up in the tradition of Punk Planet and running with it.

And yes, I am ancient enough to have read Punk Planet when it was new. Stare into the brittle degradation of my face and see the horrifying ravages of time! Soon you too shall be reduced to nothing but dust and bones!
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Brett.

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Next time on Screen Door Revolution: Monday morning. More on that new horror that we keep promising…

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Written by brett.

February 26, 2015 at 12:07 pm

Notes from New Orleans and Beyond – February 2015.

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This is not the horror you were promised last time. This is Screen Door Revolution for the 23rd of February, 2015…
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pearstour

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NEWS FROM ABROAD!

We begin today not on the fair shores of the Crescent City, where the water is reliably brown year-round, but in the far reaches of Europe, in the shadow of the Grand Budapest Hotel, in the land of Narnia, where bejeweled goblets overflow with figgy pudding and strudel… this is the Never-Ending Story of PEARS, the hardest-touring punk rock band in the history of New Orleans, who recently joined up with Red City Radio for their Ramble On 2015 Tour.  The tour finds PEARS and Red City Radio all over Germany through the end of February and into early March, before heading over to the UK, Amsterdam, and France. Select dates also feature Bear Trade (full tour dates listed in the graphic above).

Red City Radio closes out the tour sans PEARS in Russia later in March, as PEARS members Zach Quinn and Brian Pretus are due to serve hard time in a Siberian gulag for their crimes against art, the church, and Vladimir Putin.

Follow PEARS on Facebook right here.

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Meanwhile, in New Orleans…

Parisite Skate Park

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Parisite Skate Park
, which is located in my pre-Katrina ‘hood on the corner of Paris Avenue and Pleasure in Gentilly underneath the Interstate 610 overpass, will be launching a Kickstarter campaign this week to secure funding for their latest DIY installation. Antigravity Magazine‘s Dan Fox and Robert Landry highlight the Park’s long road to legitimacy in AG’s February issue, accompanied by photos from Adrienne Battistella, Ben Moore, and Sean Ambrose (featured above).

Read the full Antigravity feature right here.

Follow Parisite Skate Park at their website or via Facebook.

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AND FINALLY…

gregmanson


Greg Manson Has Never Been More Desperate for Scene Points…

I’m Fine‘s Greg Manson (pictured above in an undated file photo, communing with nature) and New Orleans-area author Mike Bowser are preparing for the release of the first issue of Eclectic Scope, a DIY ‘zine focusing on creative writing and visual arts eclecticism. Manson and Bowser are currently holding an open call for submissions for the premiere issue.

Eclectic Scope is currently accepting literature (including tour journals, reviews, editorials, poetry, prose, and fiction), as well as illustrations, photography, and paintings (black & white only at this time). Anyone interested should email Eclectic Scope at submissions@eclecticscope.com . Deadline for submissions is April 20th, 2015. Look for the first issue of Eclectic Scope in mid-May.

I’m Fine are currently recording their next release with legendary NOLA-area engineer and founding Ghostwood member James Whitten. Dig the classics or resign from punk rock forever. Look for more from I’m Fine later this year.

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Brett.
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Next time on Screen Door Revolution: The horror you were promised. For real this time. We promise.

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PORTLANDIA + MATT GROENING Perfectly Troll All SKA Fans Ever.

ska

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Above: Simpsons (+ Life in Hell, Futurama, and Bapper) creator Matt Groening (appearing in an on-camera role for the first time since the 1980s) confronts Fred Armisen‘s character over a SKA-centric piece of Simpsons bootleg merchandise. From last week’s episode of Portlandia, which airs on IFC in the U.S.
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Here’s a clip…

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YOU DON’T KNOW SKA? Welcome to America, friend. Learn music.

In my decade +plus of music journalism, I have noticed an undeniable, recurring quirk on the topic of ska music. Like the Judge in the Portlandia clip featured above, I would estimate that most people are unaware that “ska” is even a thing.

Sure, those of us who survived the culture wars of the 1990s remember (although perhaps not always fondly) the heyday of third wave American ska, a genre loosely regarded as “punk with horns” that exploded for few years before burning out like all pop culture trends. But (just based on my own experiences dealing with the general public, not necessarily hardcore music geeks, punks, or hipsters, specifically), most folks are like the Judge in Portlandia – perplexed by the existence of a surprisingly obscure and marginalized musical genre. If you’re too young to remember (or too old and grizzled by life, for that matter), perhaps a brief history lesson is in order? This is a highly distilled (abbreviated) version, so don’t yell at me if I happen to overlook some of the nuances.
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A Message to You, Rudy
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American third wave SKA is an offshoot of punk rock whose peak came during the 1990s, but ska itself is rooted in Jamaican culture and goes back much further. The term “third wave” refers to what was roughly the third generation of ska-influenced artists, following the Jamaican originals and the British 2 Tone movement of the 1970s. Amongst traditional ska artists, Desmond Dekker is regarded as the foremost grand-daddy of the genre, though certainly not the first.

Following immigration reforms in the 1970s, ska made its way from the Caribbean to the shores of the U.K., where it effectively collided with the burgeoning punk rock movement. Ska found a legendary disciple in The Clash’s Joe Strummer, who incorporated the style into numerous Clash songs, notably “Rudie Can’t Fail” and “Wrong ‘Em Boyo,” amongst others. The 2 Tone movement persisted into the 1980s, when it was (along with many of the early punk bands of the era) more or less assimilated under the umbrella of New Wave pop, and then seemingly declined as New Wave fell out of fashion.
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SKA SUCKS! The Bands Are Only In It For The Bucks
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Flash forward a decade or so to the decline of the American grunge rock movement, which found pop music tastes diverging from the grim self-seriousness of the Seattle sound that dominated American airwaves in the early 1990s. Ska’s sound is typically a bit more light-hearted, leaning more towards party music, which is what America seemed to be in the mood for circa-1995. The Mighty Mighty Bosstones‘ “The Impression That I Get” is possibly the most memorable hit ska single of its era, but numerous bands (including Sublime, NOFX, No Doubt, and Rancid) released pop singles that bolstered the narrow perception of ska as “punk with horns.”

Creatively and commercially, third wave ska was a brief, passing cultural phenomenon. Bands who had just a few years earlier focused their limited imaginations emulating Eddie Vedder suddenly found themselves adding horn sections and learning how to skank, but that golden moment in time just wasn’t meant to last. The third wave was scuttled by the end of 1997, giving way to the unbelievable horror of nu metal, then mainstream emo, and ultimately the death of mainstream rock whose wake persists to this day. Those same bands who rushed to add horns sections were tripping over themselves to add turntables and imitate Fred Durst. 1998 saw the release of what I would consider to be the final gems of the third wave (likely Less Than Jake‘s Hello Rockview in October of that year, if you want to talk chronologically), followed by just a handful of leftover sporadic notable releases into the early 2000s and then… nothing…
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A Record Scratching For Over A Decade
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In my 11+ years as a music journalist, I have covered exactly ZERO significant new ska releases by major bands. Oh sure, ska is still out there. If you live anywhere near a major college, there are probably ska shows that happen in your town, but there hasn’t been a major, critically-successful new ska band to break big or win widespread critical acclaim in many years (and yes, I am aware of The Aggrolites, but I largely regard them as a less-interesting version of The Slackers).

Ska’s lack of innovative recorded output directly reflects the live nature of the beast. Ska shows are fun, generally high-energy affairs. Ska bands often exceed seven or eight members or more when you take into account a full horn section. There’s a lot going on at a live ska performance. People go to ska shows to dance and have a sweaty good time. But, as far as I can gather, ska is a live phenomenon that, much like the beloved live local DJs in your town, is best experienced on the dance floor rather than via the recording studio. Lots of people can dig a live ska show, but how much of that can you seriously digest in your day-to-day life without the constant influx of viable new material?
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I Still Don’t Get the Joke!
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So, back to that Portlandia sketch and, more specifically, Bart SKA-mpson. One of the recurring themes of the ska genre is that ska bands often times (with startling regularity) incorporate the word SKA into some aspect of their act, whether it be their band name, album titles, or song titles, often in an attempt to create a pun. Notable examples of this in real life include SKAvoovie & The Epitones, SKA King Crab, MephiSKApheles (more on them in a sec), Ska Trek, Skarmy of Darkness… you get the idea. It’s a painful pun, owned with dignity probably only by The Skatalites and no one else, which makes Portlandia‘s skewering so perfectly on-the-nose. I guarantee that right now, in your town, at this very moment, some guy is listening to Sublime and wondering if anyone has already laid claim to “SKAlabama,” or if The Gaslight Anthem ever recorded a ska album, would they change their name to “The Gaslight SKAnthem”? Damn, that’s deep.

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Leave Ska Alone! Stop Making Fun!

The third wave wasn’t all bad. Granted, a lot of it was exceptionally bad, awful, and has gotten worse with age. I can’t recall the last time that I was able to force myself to listen to an entire Reel Big Fish or Aquabats album, but there are still a few gems from the third wave that hold-up well to this day. We’re going to take a quick scan through my iPod and have a look at what’s still active on our playlist, despite the lack of notable major American ska releases in recent years.

For the purposes of this retrospective, I’m only going to address third wave ska bands… American ska bands whose careers spanned primarily the 1990s. I don’t feel like rehashing The Clash, The Toasters, or The Specials‘ entire discographies, otherwise we might be here for awhile. Similarly, I’m excluding Operation Ivy. While certainly a forerunner amongst American punk-ska bands, bringing Op Ivy into the mix opens up a loooong discussion on Rancid’s discography that I’m not interested in writing a dissertation on this weekend. Also: no Suicide Machines. While often lumped in with third wave ska, the Suicide Machines had surprisingly few songs that incorporated horns. From a musical perspective, I would qualify them as more of a straight-up pop punk band that sometimes featured ska elements (like Rancid or NOFX). I’m also omitting The Slackers, who still occasionally surface in my rotation at home,  but have generally disappeared from my iPod for being too mellow to digest on the go. Still a good band, for sure.

I’m referencing what’s still active on my playlist as of today, in the year 2015. I have a 16MB iPod and it’s been full for awhile, necessitating constant subtractions to make room for new additions, so my playlist is fairly vetted at this point. We’re taking a look at the classics and essentials of the third wave era that still seem vital today… -

Keasbey Nights

Catch 22 – Keasbey Nights (1998)
+ Streetlight Manifesto – Everything Goes Numb (2003)

Catch 22 carried on until 2012, but without the key creative component of Tomas Kalnoky, who left the band following 1998’s Keasbey Nights and resurfaced a few years later with Streetlight Manifesto’s Everything Goes Numb. Both albums are powerful and well-written, so much so that both records dwarf everything else in both bands’ catalogs. Streetlight Manifesto re-recorded Keasbey Nights in 2006, but the original Catch 22 version remains the standard. I would classify Everything Goes Numb as the final significant release of the American third wave era, arriving several years after the party was mostly over. Considering that, it wasn’t so much a landmark release as it was a delayed continuation. Listen to Everything Goes Numb right here.

dhc-
Dance Hall Crashers – Honey, I’m Homely! (1997) + The Live Record (2000)

Everyone who fell in love with No Doubt circa 1995 would have been better off turning their attention to the Dance Hall Crashers. DHC’s discography is fairly deep – deeper than No Doubt’s, and remarkably solid from start to finish, but 1997’s Honey, I’m Homely! most commonly shows up on my playlist. 2000’s The Live Record is low on ska appeal, but qualifies as a remarkable piece of live punk rock recording. Listen to Honey, I’m Homely! right here.

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Edna’s Goldfish – Before You Knew Better (1998)

Out of print for years and one of the more obscure entries on this list, but in no way lacking in punch or significance. From the opening chords of “I’m Your Density,” it’s abundantly evident that you’re in for something awesome. Listen to Before You Knew Better right here.
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lessthanjake

Less Than Jake
Pezcore (1995) + Losing Streak (1996) + Hello Rockview! (1998)

I will admit to seeing Less Than Jake perform live roughly 15 times between 1999 and 2007, culminating with their surprise performance of Losing Streak in its entirety at Fest 6 in Gainesville. They’re still going strong today, but I would argue that the trinity of Pezcore, Losing Streak, and Hello Rockview! represents their best output. The 2002 remaster of Pezcore gets my vote over the original issue. Listen to Losing Streak right here.

- mephiskapheles

MephiSKApheles – God Bless Satan (1994)

Satanic ska? Yes, please! Nothing else in Mephiskapheles’ discography comes close to matching the manic glee of songs like “Saba” and “The Bumblebee Tuna Song.” Interestingly, the nu metal band Mudvayne famously ripped off Mephiskapheles’ logo, passing it off as their own. Just another reason that nu metal is shameful. Listen to God Bless Satan right here.
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The Mighty Mighty Bosstones

- Devil’s Night Out (1989) + Don’t Know How to Party (1993)
+ Let’s Face It (1997)

Another essential band with a fairly deep discography, few ska bands have ever come close to matching the intensity of the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. Devil’s Night Out reaches back a bit into the late 80s, but is indispensable in terms of raw grit. The main problem with the Bosstones is that they peaked creatively by the time they hit it big with 1997’s Let Face It, never quite returning to form following their mainstream break. Listen to Don’t Know How to Party right here.
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mu330

MU330 – Ultra Panic (2002)

Perhaps an example of saving the best for last, MU330 has a decent enough discography, but their final release remains the most heavily-repeated on my playlist. Ultra Panic was supposed to be followed by a Halloween album (yes, a ska Halloween album), but MU330 went on hiatus in 2008 and the brilliance of SKAlloween remains unrealized to date. We can still dream, can’t we? Listen to Ultra Panic right here.
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Slapstick – Self-Titled (1997)

This album contains most (but not all) of Slapstick’s output, encompassing the best punk sensibilities of American third wave ska. Members of Slapstick famously went on to form Alkaline Trio and The Lawrence Arms (and about a dozen other notable bands), but this is where it all started. Brilliant stuff from start to finish. If you stranded me on a desert island and gave me the option of bringing along one ska album, it would probably be this one. Listen to the whole thing right here.

- Rambarded

The Supaflies – Rambarded (1997)

Originally released on Fueled by Ramen in 1997 before being unceremoniously deleted, The Supaflies’ Rambarded stood as an elusive underground classic for more than a decade. Standout tracks include “Milk,” “Breakfast Of Champions,” “Children of the Night,” and the rowdy “Shit is Going to the Dogs,” which at one point served as the unofficial anthem of the New Orleans ska scene. Finally reissued years later by our heroes at Community Records, Rambarded hasn’t lost a lick with the passage of time and still stands as the greatest ska release in New Orleans history.  Listen to selections from Rambarded right here.

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Brett.

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Next time on Screen Door Revolution: We turn our attention back to HORROR. I’ve got a particular tale of terror coming out this year, so we’ll have a bit more of that.
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SOMETHING TERRIBLE IS HAPPENING.

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Mystery Teaser-
So, what’s all this terrible fuss about, anyway?

We’ve got quite a horror story in the works.

An illustrated tale of terror, no less.

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Keith Hogan is New Orleans’ answer to François Schuiten.

Someday, they’ll crown him like a pagan king at Angoulême.

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As much as I would love to spill more of the gory details (like, say, the title and precise release date), this teaser will have to do for now.

More on the way soon.

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Brett. -

Written by brett.

February 4, 2015 at 9:00 am

2015 – A GRAPHIC READING REVOLUTION

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Foo FightersAll this talk of 2015 this, and 2015 that.

Shoulda stopped at 1994.

Casting off the shackles of nostalgia and facing forward to meet the terrifying future head on! This is Screen Door Revolution for the 18th of January, 2015.

This week, we’ll be taking a look at some of the new year’s most promising graphic reads.

From futuristic outer space horror thrillers, to genre-defying debuts from some of the comic world’s most eclectic creators, as well as returning favorites, digital-first web gems, and long-delayed landmark funny books, there is a multitude of exceptional graphic reading on the way as we head into 2015.

Let’s get right to it…
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SouthernCross1

SOUTHERN CROSS
Image Comics

Becky Cloonan (DEMO, Gotham Academy) writes and Kill Shakespeare‘s Andy Belanger illustrates Southern Cross starting in March. Cloonan’s previous self-published works leaned a bit to the side of fantasy-horror, dating back to 2011’s Wolves and its subsequent follow-ups, The Mire and Demeter (arguably 2013’s best comic book). Southern Cross adds a bit of sci-fi space-fantasy to the mix, although the series looks to retain some of the spooky vibe of Cloonan’s previous works. Southern Cross #1 is due out on March 15th from Image Comics. Preview at Comic Book Resources.

 

phonogram3

PHONOGRAM: THE IMMATERIAL GIRL
Image Comics

First announced way back in 2012, superstar creators Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie got a bit side-tracked on the way to the party. And every issue of Phonogram is definitely a party! Following an acclaimed run on Marvel’s Young Avengers in 2013, Phonogram’s creators launched The Wicked & The Divine from Image Comics in 2014. Despite those successes, it is Phonogram which qualifies as the duo’s most beloved collaboration to date. The original Phonogram (Rue Britannia) stands as a ground-breaking work of music journalism for its graphical exploration of the rise and fall of Britpop, the 1990s wave of UK music led by groups like Oasis, Blur, and Pulp. Phonogram‘s second volume (The Singles Club) is a genre-defying sci-fi/ horror/fantasy tale about young adult robots who get off on music (got it?), not to mention a monumental breakthrough for series artists Jamie McKelvie and Matt Wilson. Phonogram‘s implied “soundtrack” explores the larger realm of pop music, drawing inspiration from artists ranging from The Clash to Dexy’s Midnight Runners, to Blondie and the delightful Pipettes. The Pipettes have unfortunately been kind of awful since Rosie left the band. She’s got her own solo thing going now and it’s quite splendid. The Immaterial Girl, named for the dark half of Emily Aster, a supporting character from Phonogram‘s first two series, is due out from Image Comics in August.

 

Curia-Regis-Issue-2

CURIA REGIS
Robin Hoelzemann

Four-plus issues into Curia Regis (or King’s Court, if you prefer), Robin Hoelzemann‘s revolutionary-era fantasy series is coming into its own after a winding, if deliberate, build-up. The exposition was a bit of a slow burn, but there’s a lot going on in this series. With every panel gorgeously rendered with a sophisticated sense of design, Hoelzemann clearly has the mettle to patiently craft this ambitious adventure tale with appropriate precision. The end result is a near-perfect blend of style and substance, mystery and adventure.  Issue 5 is due out in print this year, with brand new material appearing online twice-weekly as the series moves towards an expected collected edition in 2016. Read the latest installment of Curia Regis right here or check out the Prologue chapter, which starts things off with a bang.

 

nonplayer_2

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NONPLAYER

Image Comics

The vaporware of the comic book world returns! Nonplayer #1 was met with a staggering amount of buzz upon its arrival back in 2011, due in large part to the stunning detail of creator Nate Simpson‘s work. The first issue was an instant sellout and there was even talk of a movie (based on just one issue!). Simpson recently addressed some of the reasons for the long wait and expressed optimism that a third issue may arrive before the 5th of Never. Years in the making, the second issue continues the series’ fantasy exploration of vicarious digital lives, a bit like The Secret Life of Walter Mitty for gamers. Nonplayer #2 is due out in May from Image Comics.
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hawkeye

 

HAWKEYE
Marvel Comics

With Nonplayer returning, the onus is now on Matt Fraction and David Aja to close-out the long-delayed finale of their acclaimed hit series. The finale, which features the climactic confrontation between Hawkguy and the Tracksuit Mafia (with the fate of Pizza Dog hanging in the balance! or something…), has been delayed for so long that the final issues of this volume may actually ship after the debut of All-New Hawkeye #1, a new series which had been scheduled to debut in the spring and shift the focus away from Clint Barton and onto the younger Kate Bishop character. The final two issues of Hawkeye are tentatively penciled in to arrive in February, but don’t hold your breath. Regardless of when those issues do finally arrive in stores, they will no doubt be worth the wait. Fraction’s Hawkeye has been an unlikely landmark series for Marvel and is already regarded by some as a modern classic. Preview at Comic Book Resources.

 

aresaphrodite

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ARES & APHRODITE

Oni Press

Despite its persisting prevalence in the paperback world, romance isn’t a genre that comics visit with too much frequency these days (unless you’re talking about the latest issue of Betty & Veronica or Jughead & Mr. Weatherbee), so releases like Liz Prince’s Alone Forever or Ares & Aphrodite are always a welcome breath of fresh air. From Jamie S. Rich and Megan Levens, the creators of Madame Frankenstein, look for Ares & Aphrodite to be serialized online first via Comixology, concluding just before Valentine’s Day, followed by a print edition from Oni Press in April. Preview at Comic Book Resources.

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TERRIBLELIZARD

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TERRIBLE LIZARD
Oni Press

Like romance comics, the “giant monster” genre has been relatively under-served in recent years after once having been a staple of the comics medium. While there are occasional odd entries like Robert Kirkman’s Super Dinosaur, the debut of Stephen Bissette’s Tyrant was an astonishing two decades ago. Cullen Bunn‘s Terrible Lizard attempts to succeed where scores of Godzilla comics have failed over the years. The series is the tale of a girl and her T-Rex, but the Terrible Lizard in question isn’t really all that terrible. Artist Drew Moss (The Colonized) depicts the title character with puffy cheeks and a generally jovial demeanor, qualifying him as having more in common with Clifford the Big Red Dog than Devil Dinosaur (although Bunn does have a couple of Devil Dinosaur comics to his credit). There’s also a giant gorilla with one arm mutated into a crab claw. Awesome. Look for a collected edition in late April from Oni Press. Preview at Comic Book Resources.

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sixthguncast

 

THE SIXTH GUN
Oni Press

There are quite a few Cullen Bunn books that I could have included on this list. Besides the previously-mentioned Terrible Lizard, Bunn has also got Wolf Moon going from DC/ Vertigo and Moon Knight on the horizon at Marvel, but it’s The Sixth Gun which continues to stand as the author’s finest work. Heading into what may be its final year, one of the most criminally-under-read series in the history of comics continues its terrifying tour of the Old West with five years of story lines coming to a head. The Sixth Gun features some of the greatest sequential art that you’ll find in modern comics, with much praise due to series artists Brian Hurtt and Bill Crabtree.

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antman

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ANT-MAN

Marvel Comics

Don’t laugh! Okay, maybe laugh just a little. Ant-Man is in for a big year, if not for his big screen debut, then certainly for his all-new print adventures from author Nick Spencer (Morning Glories) and illustrator Ramon Rosanas (Night of the Living Deadpool). Spencer previously showed his knack for writing somewhat lesser Marvel characters in last year’s cult hit Superior Foes of Spider-Man, along with co-authoring Avengers World with Jonathon Hickman. Issue 2 features the title character going up against The Grizzly, one of Marvel’s Z-grade villains, so expect some of the anarchistic flavor of Superior Foes to carry over into Spencer’s current series. Ant-Man #2 arrives in comic shops on February 4th. Look for a collected edition in May.

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cocotte

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COCOTTE
Kat Vapid & Ryan Kelly

Ryan Kelly (Star Wars, Coffin Hill, Funrama Presents) and Kat Vapid continue to cook up one of the best comic serials on the web. Centered around a fictional Minneapolis restaurant, Cocotte enters its third year on the verge of beginning a new chapter as the flashback narrative of Dave and Carole’s college romance (and Dave’s trip to Japan) comes to a close and the series returns its attention to Dave’s adult life as a kitchen cook alongside Abby. Every entry in Cocotte is a feast for the eyes, thanks to Ryan Kelly’s blue and gray-hued illustrations. A print collection seems like a no-brainer, but as of yet, no publisher has been announced. Start reading Cocotte online for free right here.

 

injection

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INJECTION
Image Comics

A year after revitalizing Marvel’s Moon Knight, author Warren Ellis re-teams with artist Declan Shalvey for another dark fantasy tale. Shalvey’s artwork looks like it’s been on a bit of a tear over the last year or two, evolving from the somewhat simpler, Charlie Adlard-inspired style from his earlier runs on Thunderbolts and 28 Days Later before it. Eisner-Award winning colorist Jordie Bellaire rounds out Injection‘s all-star creative team. This should be a nice companion piece if you’re reading Ellis’s other current Image sci-fi fantasy series, Trees (which features art from Jason Howard). Be on the lookout for Injection #1 from Image Comics on May 15th. Preview at Bleeding Cool.

 

PLUTONA

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PLUTONA

Image Comics

Jeff Lemire (Sweet Tooth) collaborates with Emi Lenox and Jordie Bellaire for Plutona, a tale of childhood trauma focusing on some kids who find the body of a dead superhero in the woods. Plutona is definitely not a kids story. Details are sparse so far, but Plutona‘s premise sounds a bit like a superhero-themed episode of Goosebumps, but definitely meant for grown-ups. Kids, don’t read Plutona or you’ll scar yourself for life! Jeff Lemire is known for being a creep from previous scripting stints on Animal Man and Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E. from DC Comics, so terrible (and probably bizarro) chills are likely in order. Look for Plutona #1 on sale from Image Comics later in 2015.

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Brett.
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When in New Orleans, be sure to visit Crescent City Comics (uptown), BSI Comics (Metairie), and Big Easy Comics (Covington).
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Dear Smart People: YOU ARE LOSING THE CULTURE WAR

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You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.

- Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing.

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Ray BradburyThe former home of legendary science fiction and horror author Ray Bradbury has been demolished.
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Bradbury, who passed away in 2012, was the author of such 20th century science fiction classics as Fahrenheit 451, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and the collected Martian Chronicles. He was also a noted screenwriter, with many of his works translated for television, movies, and comic books, including It Came From Outer Space, episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Twilight Zone, 65 episodes of his own television series, Ray Bradbury Theater from 1985-1992, and an animated film based on his 1972 work, The Halloween Tree, in 1993.
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Fahrenheit 451 was long-discussed as a possible Mel Gibson film, but thankfully that never came to be.
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BELOW: A look at the razed Los Angeles home of Ray Bradbury. Reblogged from File770“Viewing the Remains of Ray Bradbury’s Home” – January 12. 2015. John King Tarpinian.

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demolished
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As the author notes – “In Los Angeles a home that cost $1,765,000 is considered a tear down.”
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This, coupled with the recent loss of the historic Great Gatsby house, continues a disheartening trend of disregard for the preservation of America’s culturally-significant literary landmarks.
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But why is this happening now? In 2015, in our post-preservationist culture where every artifact is revered as sacred; every last piece of trash, someone else’s treasure?
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Tarpinian notes in his pictorial:
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As I was taking pictures locals were walking their dogs. They’d stop to observe and we’d converse. One lady had no idea who had owned the house; she was new to the neighborhood. She walked away in tears. Another long time neighbor knew it was Ray’s home and we mutually agreed things like this are just wrong but money wins out. Another young couple had no idea who Ray was…the saddest encounter of all.
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There’s little doubt in my mind that, say, James Franco’s house will someday be preserved as a culturally-significant landmark for future generations to behold, gilded and immortalized for all-time, and hailed as a triumph of freedom.
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I apologize if perhaps this notion seems, at first, overly cynical, but it’s not hard to look around and read the tea leaves. The Gatsby house is allowed to crumble and Ray Bradbury’s house knocked down for the sum of $1.7 million, thus depriving future generations the ability to physically visit those places where the stuff of dreams was quite literally created. And what exactly of significance and value are we leaving in place of that loss? Another Walgreens? Another CVS or horrifying McDonald’s? And nowhere interesting to visit besides Disneyland?
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Despite the counter-culture movements of the 1960s and 1990s, we have unquestionably arrived in a world in which literature is an afterthought, as people readily-embrace corporate drivel, marketing and click-baiting in place of legitimate journalism, a constant barrage of hype in place of substance, blockbuster films about tiny plastic blocks and Ouija boards… I’m digressing a bit, so I’ll save the rant for my upcoming post about the existence of SLC Punk 2…
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Is Fahrenheit 451 even included in the English curriculum of most modern public schools? I seem to recall that we visited it twice, between my 7th and 12th grade years, but that was a long time ago… back in the 90s… so it’s somewhat difficult for me to judge whether today’s culture-saturated youth would relate to a dusty old story about book burning.
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Maybe if it were redone as a cautionary tale about someone burning our iPhones?
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ray_bradbury

“I have never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room.”

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- Ray Bradbury (1920-2012)

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Notes From New Orleans and Beyond – January 2015

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A New Year has arrived and we’ve got all the senseless, ticklish goods and square-dancing tips that are fit to print. Promenade! This is Screen Door Revolution for the 4th of January 2015.
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Local Ska Kids Make Good, Win Hearts, Minds, Universal Acclaim

newsiesNew Orleans-based indie label Community Records recently received several mentions in Impose Magazine‘s 2014 retrospective series, landing on their  Best Labels of 2014 list, bearing mention alongside such other infinitely-cool labels as Salinas and Don Giovanni. That’s good company if you can keep it! Community’s Ex-Breathers/ Ovlov/ Woozy/ Gnarwhal EP was also mentioned as one of Impose’s  best splits or compilations of the year. The 4-way split release was also mentioned in Exploding in Sound‘s 2014 Year End review. Founded in 2008 by All People‘s Greg Rodrigue (pictured in the photo to the right) with a DIY ethos similar to Mike Park’s Asian Man Records, Community Records’ catalog has grown remarkably deep over the last couple of years. Community closed out 2014 with a string of well-regarded releases from the likes of Caddywhompus, Cement Matters, and Sharkanoid. Look for new releases from Sun Hotel and Pope in the first quarter of 2015. Be sure to check out some of their back catalog selections from Maddie Ruthless, Dead Legends, and Murphy’s Kids.

Get more from Community Records right here or drop by Hey! Cafe on Magazine Street in New Orleans for free advice and valuable life lessons. Be sure to ask Greg to play “Trigonometry” every time you stop by, repeatedly, for the next few years. He’ll think it’s hilarious.

 

pearagPEARS Reveal All in Antigravity Tour Shocker-

We recently reported on PEARS’ upcoming European tour plans with Red City Radio. On Christmas Eve, Antigravity Magazine presented the greatest gift of all in the form of PEARS’ 2014 Tour Diaries, which you can check out right here. PEARS frontman Zach Quinn dishes about PEARS’ recent shows with The Briggs, The Applicators (somehow still together! I saw them open up for Bad Religion at the Howlin’ Wolf in New Orleans like 15 years ago), and a tour stop at a Ninja Turtles-themed venue in Boise. Kids, let this be a lesson. You should never, ever give up on Turtle Power, eat lots of pizza, investigate open canisters of glowing green mutagen ooze whenever possible, and all of your dreams will come true.

The latest issue of Antigravity will be hitting the streets around the Greater New Orleans area starting this Tuesday. Always free, look for Antigravity where you find The Gambit (such as -but not limited to- Molly’s At The Market, Mushroom Records, most PJ’s Coffee locations, Guitar Center in Elmwood, Crescent City Comics, and One Eyed Jack’s). Look for Valerie Sassyfras featured on the cover of the January issue.

 

Greg Manson is Down to ZERO Scene Points

Capitalist Kids flyer

How much lower can he possibly sink? Find out when New Orleans pop punk bands I’m Fine and Name Calling welcome the return of The Capitalist Kids, who are making a return trip to New Orleans.

I am told by sources close to the band that I’m Fine’s Greg Manson may soon be selling out rock n’ roll forever, so your chances to see the present incarnation of I’m Fine perform live may be numbered. Expect Lawrence Arms-y/ Latterman-ish pop punk and sing along songs that don’t necessarily rely on hooks. I’m Fine’s most recent EP, With A Lot to Learn, was released in 2012.

Check out The Capitalist Kids with I’m Fine and Name Calling on Tuesday, January 13th at The Dragon’s Den, 435 Esplanade Ave. in New Orleans. Showtime is 9pm.

Name Calling also have a show planned for January 10th at The Circle Bar in New Orleans with Easy Bake Oven. Doors open at 8:45pm.

Capitalist Kids’ tour also takes them through Baton Rouge on January 12th and Shreveport, La. on January 14th. Check out Capitalist Kids’ full slate of their tour dates right here or visit them on Facebook.

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Lovey Dovies 2014 EP

Local Band Hasn’t Forgotten 1994,
Somehow Gets It Right

New Orleans indie-punks The Lovey Dovies (featuring members of Big Baby and The Black Belt Band playing awesome prog-rock that you can occasionally sing along to, like the hazed-out second coming of all of your favorite 90s bands) just wrapped up their latest U.S. tour. While on the road, the band issued Taunting the Cosmos, a 3-song tour EP, their first release since 2012’s well-regarded (4-star) full-length release, Shive. Download Taunting the Cosmos right here.

As of this posting, The Lovey Dovies currently don’t have any shows scheduled, but you can keep up with them via Facebook and also scour the show listings over at NOLA-DIY.

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Sisters in ChristMike Patton Debuts Impossibly Catchy Sisters in Christ Theme

Sometimes, when I want to torment my little sister, I hold a flashlight to my face and tell her that that guy from the Foo-Fighters used to be the drummer of her favorite band. She’s too young to remember that as a fact, or to have witnessed the twisted, senseless manner in which history often unfolds. Someday, I’m going to explain Eddie Vedder to her so she’ll be able to understand Local H‘s discography.

Back in December, we told you about Sisters in Christ, a new specialty record store which recently opened on Freret Street in New Orleans, not far from the University area. After just a few short weeks of existence, Sisters in Christ now has its own theme song courtesy of Vista Blue, one of Nola-Nashville Mike Patton‘s numerous projects. Patton has a long career of drafting awesome pop songs that fit in with the Ramones-Weezer-Teen Idols-Queers school of punk rock, including lengthy tenures in groups like The Robinsons, The Sally Stitches, and The Loblaws.

Stream the “Sister in Christ” theme right here. Also, be sure to check out Vista Blue’s recent compilation appearances on the Dismembering Christmas Soundtrack and the Radiant Radish Collective 2014 Sampler. Vista Blue’s Mike Patton also co-hosts the Body Count Horror Podcast. Also be sure to check out Patton’s 2013 novella, The Horror Movie Society. Or the Faith No More Companion.

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Deception

Who Lives on Snake Mountain?

Skeletor, the Master of the Universe.

Last time, we told you about the debut of Sick Like Sinatra‘s epic musical presentation of A He-Man and She-Ra Christmas, a holiday spectacular which unfolded in New Orleans back on December 18th. Sick Like Sinatra has made a full stream of the live presentation available online. Download here (via Dropbox) and learn all the words to sing a long to “Snake Mountain,” one of the show’s most memorable numbers. Be forewarned, gentle hearts and sensitive ears – the comedic stylings of Sick Like Sinatra are not always family-friendly and are perhaps best enjoyed with a stiff drink and a bawdy sense of humor. Learn more about the secret occult history of Snake Mountain via Gary Greenwald’s highly-informative documentary, “Deception of a Generation.”

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STARTLING NEWS FROM ABROAD!

Chloe NoonanGreat Beast Comics, arguably the most promising UK indie comics publisher to emerge in recent years, has decided to close up shop.

Robot 6 reported the disheartening news of the demise of Marc Ellerby and Adam Cadwell’s acclaimed small press publisher in mid-December. In an announcement posted via their blog, Great Beast cited the time-consuming nature of managing and promoting a growing publishing outfit with limited resources while still finding time for artistic/ creative production.

Great Beast was notably the home to Ellerby’s Chloe Noonan: Monster Hunter and  Cadwell’s Blood Blokes, both of which were profiled here on Screen Door Revolution back in the summer of 2013. Great Beast’s publishing output also included Dan Berry’s Carry Me, John Riordian and Dan Cox’s Hitsville UK, Robert M. Ball’s Winter’s Knight and Dangeritis, and Rachel Smith’s House Party.

Great Beast’s catalog is on clearance through January 7th. Their archive will remain available digitally through Comixology’s download service.

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And Finally…

We leave you this week with a look at Hiroyuki Okiura‘s A Letter to Momo. Since Hayao Miyazaki announced his intention to retire in 2013 following the release of his 11th full-length animated feature, The Wind Rises, there has been some question of who, if anyone, will rise to fill the void left by the legendary animator’s exit. Miyazaki leaves behind a legacy unparalleled by anyone in animation history, save for Walt Disney. His works of note include Kiki’s Delivery Service, My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, and the much-beloved Spirited Away. To that end, some critics have suggested Hiroyuki Okiura, whose resume includes everything from Akira to Ghost in the Shell to Cowboy Bepop: The Movie. Okiura also served as animation director of Paprika. Okiura stepped into the role of lead director for A Letter to Momo, a film which made its limited debut on the festival circuit way back in 2011, but only recently saw a U.S. theatrical release in 2014. The film departs from the generally darker tone of some of the works that I just mentioned, and maybe, just maybe, channels a bit of the magic that Miyazaki came to be renowned for. Here’s the trailer for A Letter to Momo’s 2014 U.S. theatrical release via Hollywood.com …

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Brett.
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Next Time on Screen Door Revolution: More updates on the rising square-dancing epidemic. Plus: A tale of escalating horror. Big news on the way.

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